Are Split Placements Right for Your Recruitment Firm?

by Veronica Blatt

If you have not previously engaged in split placements, it may be hard to determine if that would be a good option for your recruitment firm. Here are some questions that can help you decide if splits are right for you:

Do you have more jobs than you can fill on your own, and not enough candidates? Split placements can provide a source of candidates, especially for jobs that are outside of your normal specialty. Read the rest of this entry »


Replace NO with YES, BUT!

by Dave Nerz

In recruitment it is not always easy to get what you want or even what is needed to deliver top talent. Sometimes you just need to walk away and say NO to something that is headed the wrong way. Before sealing the deal’s fate with a NO, why not try what some refer to as the evil twin of YES, AND…try a YES, BUT.

I heard a recruiter recount a story recently in which a longtime client that had been increasingly difficult to work with asked a recruiter to do a search for a senior leadership role. The recruiter, overwhelmed with many easier-to-fulfill-upon open orders was going to say NO. A moment of inspiration hit the recruiter just before saying NO and they said, “YES, BUT I will require a search engagement fee of some proportion based on the importance of the role and time I will need to invest.” The result was an agreed YES and a retained search fee in place and working toward a filled position. Read the rest of this entry »


How to Get More Work from Clients

by Liz Carey

What do you do if your client comes to you with a job order that you don’t have the bandwidth to help fill? How can you keep your client happy without adding to your costs by hiring another recruiter or opening a branch in another location?

Many recruiters turn to a split placement network, which gives you access to trading partners all over the globe, to help gain more clients, get more work from current clients, and start to broaden their reach nationally and even internationally. While some recruiters may balk at having to split a fee, recruiters who do splits understand that half a fee is better than no fee at all.

Here are a few recent examples of how NPAworldwide members were able to help fulfill their clients’ needs by utilizing network resources – and pocketing part of a split fee they otherwise would not have been able to obtain: Read the rest of this entry »


US Hiring Plans at a 13-Year High

by Veronica Blatt

global payroll outlookManpower Group has released the results of its Q3 Global Employment Outlook, a comprehensive survey of more than 59,000 employers in 44 countries and territories. The survey asked these employers how they expect total hiring to change for the period ending September 30th compared to the current quarter. Hiring plans across the global remain strong with increased headcount anticipated in 43 of the 44 surveyed locations. Read the rest of this entry »


Placing candidates abroad should be relevant for your business!

by Veronica Blatt

Today’s guest blogger is Mike Phillips from Its International, offering support and advice for contractors overseas and the recruiters who place them. Learn why international recruitment is an opportunity you should not avoid.

Too few recruitment SSE’s (Small-Size Enterprises employing less than 50 people) place or even think about placing outside their home countries.

‘International Business’ rarely surfaces during in-house meetings. Even after 20 years’ solid experience guiding recruiters of all sizes through their journeys into foreign markets, I remain disappointed but not really surprised most SSE’s still consider ‘making international placements’ a business which is only accessible by other recruiters. Read the rest of this entry »


Prepare, Prepare, Prepare

by Veronica Blatt

image of job interviewToday’s guest blogger is Paulette Steele with Real Resumes located in Queensland, Australia. Real Resumes is educating people from beginning to end on getting a job.  Short videos cover all aspects including: where to look for a job, writing effective resumes, researching and preparing for the interview, and most importantly, mastering the interview itself. Paulette has 15 years of recruitment experience and a vast career in various industries.

We hear the words Location, Location, Location when it comes to finding good real estate. Well, it’s Prepare, Prepare, Prepare when it comes to finding a job and particularly when getting ready for a job interview.

There is a lot of emphasis put on resumes and sure they are important to get your foot in the door, so to speak. However, if you are going to nail that interview and turn it into a job offer, you need to do a lot of preparation for the interview. The more you prepare, the more confident you will be in the actual interview. You can be thrown any question and be comfortable with answering it. Read the rest of this entry »


Goodnight Recruiters

by Liz Carey

As a member engagement specialist with NPAworldwide, I spend my days talking to recruiters about their jobs, their candidates, and connecting them to other NPA members who may be able to help them with their reqs. After I clock out, it doesn’t mean work is over… I have a 2.5 year old son. Currently, his favorite book is the classic Goodnight Moon. I’ve read it so many times, that I thought it would be fun to re-write it as an ode to recruiters everywhere. Read the rest of this entry »


Common Myths About Split Placements

by Veronica Blatt

NPAworldwide is a global recruitment network that exists to help its members make split placements. We’re in our 63rd year of business, and we’re big believers in splits. Today I’d like to address some common myths about working split deals.

Split placements are inherently dangerous. There are people who avoid splits because they believe there is a high risk that they won’t get paid (if they provide the candidate) or that a split partner would infringe on their client relationship. While splits may carry some inherent risk, that risk can be easily mitigated with a good written agreement. I’ve included a link at the end of the post to a free sample split placement agreement that might serve as a good starting point if you don’t already have something. Splits *do* require a high degree of trust. It can be hard to trust a new partner, especially if you’ve been burned previously. Read the rest of this entry »


4 Ways to Stay Ahead Of Competition in the Recruiting Game

by Liz Carey

It’s hockey playoff time, and it got me thinking about how hockey can draw comparisons to the recruiting world.

In a huge upset, the record-setting Tampa Bay Lightning (who were the best team all season) were eliminated from the Stanley Cup playoffs in the first round. How did they fail to win a single playoff game and get swept by the eighth-seeded Columbus Blue Jackets?

Easy, they were too good. When you are used to dominating, you can end up taking it for granted, and it becomes almost expected. That’s when you let your guard down and become vulnerable.

Similarly in recruiting, it’s not always the best man that wins. You might have a longstanding relationship with a client, but suddenly get undercut by a competitor and lose that business.

Just because something has been working for you for a long time, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t constantly be trying to grow, progress and learn. If you put yourself on cruise control, you’re going to get edged out by someone battling for your business.

Here’s 4 ways to stay ahead of the competition in the recruiting game:

1. Constantly grow your network:

  • Identify one new resource for finding candidates. Ask your candidates where they go when they are seeking a new opportunity. Get recommendations on trade publications and blogs they read and join in the discussion. Join professional associations in your candidates’ niche. Ramp up networking efforts on social media sites like LinkedIn. Implement a candidate referral program. Attracting candidates that your clients can’t find on their own through job board ads or website postings will ensure that you’re a resource that they can’t eliminate.

2. Be aware of competition:

  • Whether it’s other recruiters or your client’s internal recruiters, know who your competitors are and what they are up to. Check their websites, social media and job postings. Knowing what they offer will help you understand your offerings and where you can differentiate yourself. For example, you could offer your candidates resume writing, coaching, or interview prep.

3. Promote your brand and be visible:

  • Even if you are a longstanding firm, it’s important to stay on top of marketing. Stay active on social media and within industry-related groups. Engage in discussions in groups and forums related to your industry. Attend job fairs, networking events, and industry conferences. Hand out your business card.

4. Stay up-to-date on trends:

  • Clients and candidates may find benefit in new advances in technology, whether it’s mobile apps, live and editable documents with real-time updates on job postings and candidates, or video interviewing. Operating more efficiently and flexibly with automated and mobile solutions will make your firm stand out to clients and candidates.

How do you stay competitive in the cut-throat world of recruiting?


Recruiter Relationships Are Still Critical

by Veronica Blatt

Our guest blogger is Pam Robison of J. Gifford Inc. in Tulsa, Oklahoma. J. Gifford Inc. is a small, quality conscious firm providing highly individualized recruiting services to clients on a local, regional, national and international basis. The firm’s recruiting activities are focused on professional, technical and managerial placement, as well as contractor and international staffing for clients. Pam is the Director of the US Midwest Region for the NPAworldwide Board of Directors. Today, Pam discusses the importance of strong recruiter relationships.

I’ve been a professional recruiter for about 15 years now. My how the landscape has changed over the years! Technology is king. Today’s recruiting is currently being defined by the strongest candidate driven market I’ve ever seen. Here in the USA there is an extreme shortage of talent. Read the rest of this entry »