Employers

13 Reasons Why Our Recruitment Firm Will Deliver Results

by Sarah Freiburger

Our network, NPAworldwide, offers the prestige recruitment firms that belong a number of unique characteristics that define each one as a leading specialist recruitment agency.

1) A Large Pool of Professionals

Our consultants are professionals and work as a team to find the best candidate for your company, as opposed to competing against one another for commissions.

2) Global Reach

With 600 offices in over 50 countries, our 1,500 plus consultants are able to source candidates from around the world.

3) Depth of Experience

We have over 60 years of experience as a specialist recruitment brand.

4) Consistency of Service

We will not compromise on quality in order to secure a commission. Our focus is on finding the right people for our clients with a view to establishing successful long-term relationships with a single point of contact.

5) Industry Specialists

Our brand prides itself on having specialists in nearly every industry your hiring needs may be in.

6) Training and Development

Our firms invest heavily in training and development to ensure they are up to speed with the newest and most innovative ways to connect with talent.

7) Reputation

Since 1956 our reputation proceeds us and we primarily grow by referral and repeat business.

8) Maximum Exposure For Your Ad

As one of the largest recruitment networks, we offer our clients priority positioning in the market through our network.

9) Managing Candidate Response

We pride ourselves not only with the relationships maintained with our clients, but candidates as well. Every candidate receives a timely response that represents your company as you would like to represent yourself.

10) Proven Case Studies

Reach out to us or one of our firms to learn more about real case studies that have resulted in high level and cross border placements.


The Need for Business Continuity Planning to Make It Through a Pandemic

by Veronica Blatt

Today’s guest blogger is Art Boyle, VP of Risk Management, and Certified Business Continuity Professional (CBCP) of People 2.0’s Global Search and Recruiting Support Division. People 2.0 is a is a global provider of employer of record, agent of record,  and back-office services for recruiting and staffing firms. People 2.0 is an NPAworldwide Endorsed Program.

“He who fails to plan is planning to fail.” —Winston Churchill

Having helped organizations develop business resiliency and continuity strategies for many years, I can attest to the importance of creating a business continuity plan (BCP). A well-developed BCP can help ensure your company continues to operate near normal during times of crisis.

Overcoming Common Challenges

Business continuity planning doesn’t come without its challenges, and I believe the first step to creating a BCP is overcoming two critical “roadblocks.”

The first one is the classic “This (or that) won’t happen to me.” I’ve had variations of that sentence uttered to me thousands of times. The second impediment is “I can figure it out if it happens.”

Getting past those misconceptions can be difficult. Often, it takes a seminal event—like the one we are experiencing now during COVID-19—to change the mindset around the first roadblock about the need for continuity planning. The counter to the second argument is a simple one: “OK, but what if you aren’t around? Shouldn’t the plans be memorialized so that someone else can carry the baton if needed?”

Once you get past those issues, the real work begins.

Creating a Business Impact Analysis

In a disaster or recovery situation, not all are created equal. You need to identify critical functions, employees, and processes. You need to be able to concentrate your finite resources to ensure that they remain operating. This is done via a business impact analysis (BIA). The BIA will quickly and efficiently identify those functions, vendors, employees, and processes that are essential to ensure that vital elements of the business continue to operate with as little disruption as possible.

Constructing Your Business Continuity Plan

Once you’ve completed your BIA, the second phase of the process begins, which is to construct your business continuity plan(s). Note: Plans should be somewhat unique to each business process/function. This is not a “one size fits all” scenario.

Your plans should contain identification of the following:

  • Hardware/software used in operating your business
  • Critical periods within your business (e.g., month-end, quarter-end)
  • Dependencies (Are you dependent on another company or process?)
  • Special or unique equipment that is critical
  • Vital records
  • Employees (email, mobile phone numbers, computer capabilities, etc.)
  • Essential vendors

The Importance of Communication

Finally: communication. Fear of the unknown can lead to critical missteps in executing your business continuity plans. Over-communicate to customers, employees, vendors, and other constituencies. Share with them your BCP plans; get their input.

You cannot communicate enough in a disaster. Even if the message is “we don’t know—yet,” your voice itself will be a powerful tool to assure those who are the most panicked that there is indeed a plan!

The COVID-19 pandemic has made business leaders more aware of the importance of business continuity planning. Business continuity planning is a critical aspect of risk management and can help ensure your company survives during times of crisis like we’re in right now.


Navigating Remote Talent Acquisition

by Sarah Freiburger

It is no secret that in past years recruitment technology trends were changing how traditional HR processes were being conducted. Prior to the pandemic however, they were primarily a way to enable the final decisions in hiring rather than being the only way to decide.

While employers need to understand especially now in an ever-tightening market retention is key, adoption of technology is essential not only for current companies navigating a work from home landscape, but a hiring from home landscape also has entered the scene.

Andre Belmonte, VP of Sales at Gray Peak Hire recently discussed the following 6 emerging trends to be on top of and consider how you are utilizing in your company or as a recruiter helping your clients navigate. Regarding companies using emergency technology:

  1. They are leveraging big data to implement evidence-based talent acquisition, retention, and performance measuring that improves decision-making and the development of success metrics.
  2. The development of mobile apps that increase access to company resources anytime and from anywhere an internet access point is available. This is a crucial millennial demographic demand for both schedule flexibility and WFH communication connectivity.
  3. The technology to connect via social media to both employees and the global talent pool is a critical tool to have in the HR toolbox. From the talent acquisition point of view, it exposes the company to a much larger talent pool that is also a driver for developing remote working policies.
  4. Connectivity and communication using cloud and SaaS technology is a foundational cornerstone for any company in modern times. It allows employees a means to do work from anywhere, anytime, and enables WFH capability. For talent acquisition, it will enable HR to develop recruitment programs that leverage the critical corporate competitive advantages to acquire frontline talent.
  5. Technology advantages are also gained by potential employees that bring their knowledge of tech to bear in configuring a WFH tech stack that works for both the company and the WFH employee. In addition to the tech advantages, it also provides the company with a cost-effective means to hire new people.
  6. Wearable technology is both a blessing and a curse, but an inevitable requirement for companies to pay attention to. In 2020, the number of wearables that will enter the modern work environment, WFH, or office, will grow to seventy million. This tech comes with security risks and well as communication advantages. The proper protocols will have to be put in place to protect the integrity of company computer resources.

All of this changing landscape has forced recruiters to adapt as well. What challenges are you facing recruiting new talent?


No Work Life Balance, The New Normal?

by Liz Carey

It truly is an unprecedented time – never before have so many companies been forced to drastically change their operations in the span of just a few weeks. Most companies, whether or not they already had work-from-home employees, had to transition to a fully remote operation.

When the world opens back up after the Covid-19 pandemic, what will the “new normal” look like? Will the work-from-home experiment continue? Many companies, including Facebook, Google, Twitter and Square, have already extended remote work through the end of the year and/or indefinitely.

A survey of CFOs by research firm Gartner found that 74 percent of companies plan to shift some employees to remote work permanently. It is estimated that 30 percent of the entire workforce will work from home at least a couple times a week, compared to less than 10 percent before the pandemic.

On the surface, this sounds great. But this flexibility doesn’t necessarily equate to a better work-life balance — in fact, many are experiencing the opposite effect. While work-from-home does allow the opportunity to get up from your desk and say, throw in a load of laundry, or walk the dog, it also doesn’t allow you to ever “punch out” and leave the office.

“Several data sources show that the typical workday is getting longer. People are signing on earlier and answering questions and queries later, thanks in part to the software that makes all this possible. You’re not leaving to go home. You’re already home,” according to this article from Vox.

Because you have all your work technology at home with you, it’s hard to actually leave work and tune out. Not to mention the other challenges that the pandemic has thrown along the way – homeschooling, daycares closed, etc. Additionally, companies have increased the number of meetings (whether Zoom / Skype / conference call) to help with communication/accountability, and now many workers are feeling over-scheduled and over it.

Bloomberg found that about 45 percent of workers said they were burned out after working from home.

Granted, a lot of this falls on the employee to set a schedule and treat working from home just as they would coming into the office – put on real “work” clothes, set boundaries, etc. But employers also have to realize that working-from-home flexibility may not be a “perk” that keeps employees there… many employees prefer having an office to go into, co-workers to converse with, a lunch room to escape to, etc. Work from home post-Covid will more likely be an adjustment rather than a benefit in an employee’s eyes. Make sure your expectations are realistic and your employees can still maintain a work-life balance, especially when that line is blurred.


HR Best Practices in a COVID-19 Working Environment

by Veronica Blatt

Today’s guest blogger is Ed McConnell with HUB International, discussing best practices for HR departments during the coronavirus pandemic. HUB International provides a wide range of business and personal insurance options including liability, health, life, and more.

COVID-19 has quickly become a malady of its own for human resources departments, as employers across the U.S. struggle to make sense of new HR and employment practices liability (EPL) issues.

In the wake of the pandemic which has affected more Americans than any other country to date, employee benefits (EB), pay continuation, employee medical information confidentiality, Family and Medical Leave Act, Americans with Disabilities Act, layoffs, furloughs and more are a concern for just about every industry. We have provided some HR department coronavirus considerations in this new, ever-evolving world. Read the rest of this entry »


Company Culture: Hiring and Onboarding During a Pandemic

by Dave Nerz

Our recruitment network just completed a survey of our global recruiters regarding trends during these days of the COVID-19 pandemic. What we found is that there is still hiring activity out there, but much reduced from more normal times. Some of this reduction in activity allows recruiters and employers the time needed to hire, onboard, and showcase company culture in a completely new way.

So during a pandemic, the dinner meetings, lunches with prospective new hires and even the basic face-to-face meeting preceded by a solid handshake are things of the past. Good candidates and good matches for open positions are still out there, but the process to find and attract this talent needs some updating. Read the rest of this entry »


As A Small Business, Should I Hire a Recruitment Agency?

by Sarah Freiburger

These past few months have likely impacted your small business in one way or another. Many businesses experienced some level of layoffs or employee changes and as they look to find a new normal and anticipate what is to come, it might seem that hiring a recruitment agency to fill vacancies is an expense you should cut.

Smaller employers often think the following in regard to hiring:

  • You should search for candidates yourself
  • Working with recruiters is a waste of time
  • Reviewing resumes for the “right candidate” should be done by yourself as you know best who to interview, and
  • Hiring a recruiter is too expensive for a small budget.

However, the reality is when you speak with a small employer who has successfully used a recruitment agency, the comment you most often hear is that they cannot believe they had spent so much time and energy trying to find the “right candidate” even though they thought they had been saavy by using a variety of ways including placing ads on large and specialized job boards.

What many do not understand is that if you first try a recruitment agency on a contingent basis, you would only pay the recruiter if you hired candidate presented by the recruiter. BAM! All of that time and frustration spent trying to learn HOW to recruit a candidate for your company is returned to you as the professional takes over.

Our member’s clients comment that by using a recruitment agency they:

  • Filled the position faster.
  • Spent less money considering the overall cost of hiring which included the cost of their time to search for candidates.
  • Had the “right candidate” for the position delivered to them.

Bottom line: If you have not yet tried to use an independent recruitment agency, these next few months would be the time to find one that can help you come out stronger.


Returning to Work After the Pandemic

by Veronica Blatt

If you’re a business owner or manager whose team is currently working remotely, have you started to think about what returning to work will look like? You will need to have a plan in place to ensure worker safety, even in an office environment. This will be true whether you own a building or rent space. Some things you may need to consider in your plan:

Maintaining social distancing in your office

Those in an open floor plan will need to create physical separation between work spaces. Ideas include moving work stations farther apart (if feasible), installing “sneeze guards” or other barriers, and working in shifts. This could mean some people work from home while others work from the office. It could mean having people working at different times of the day. Read the rest of this entry »


Protecting Your Organization and Workforce During Global Crisis

by Veronica Blatt

Today’s guest blogger is SafeGuard Global. For nearly a decade, organizations around the world have relied on SafeGuard Global for their global HR needs, specifically around payroll and employee compliance. SafeGuard Global is an Endorsed Program sponsor of NPAworldwide. The post below gives practical advice to follow during a global crisis.

Although today’s global pandemic and the resulting economic turbulence are hurting some industries harder than others, it’s likely that everyone will feel some effect. If, before the global crisis, your organization’s goals or plans included international expansion and hiring, you may be trying to figure out how and whether to proceed. Read the rest of this entry »


The Cost of Toxic Employees

by Veronica Blatt

Today’s guest blogger is Paulette Steele with Real Resumes located in Queensland, Australia. Real Resumes is educating people from beginning to end on getting a job.  Short videos cover all aspects including: where to look for a job, writing effective resumes, researching and preparing for the interview, and most importantly, mastering the interview itself. Paulette has 15 years of recruitment experience and a vast career in various industries. She writes about toxic employees below.

The first thing to address is – what is a ‘toxic employee? What kind of person fits this description? Well to sum it up, toxic employees are people who don’t fit your company culture, produce a low standard of work, take more sick days than others and don’t fit in well with the rest of the team. You know the kind of people we’re talking about, right!!

Their toxicity spreads like wildfire leading to high turnover rates, and a general vibe of unhappiness. Besides that, there’s the lost clients/customers and business opportunities. Read the rest of this entry »