How tech recruiters can overcome the new H-1B visa changes

by Veronica Blatt

Today’s guest blogger is Kate Ashford, Monster contributor. Monster Worldwide, Inc. (NYSE:MWW), is the global leader in successfully connecting job opportunities and people. Monster uses the world’s most advanced technology to help people Find Better, matching job seekers to opportunities via digital, social and mobile solutions including monster.com®, our flagship website, and employers to the best talent using a vast array of products and services. As an Internet pioneer, more than 200 million people have registered on the Monster Worldwide network.  Today, with operations in more than 40 countries, Monster provides the broadest, most sophisticated job seeking, career management, recruitment and talent management capabilities globally. For more information visit about-monster.com.

Anyone who’s relied on the kind of talent afforded by the H-1B visa program (think programmers, engineers and scientists) is probably feeling the pain of recent changes—and struggling to fill the hiring gaps these new rules have created.

The H-1B visa program provides temporary visas to educated foreign professionals to work in “specialty occupations” – think mathematics, engineering and technology. For the tech industry, workers on H-1B visas are a huge commodity, as the U.S. doesn’t have enough skilled tech workers to meet demand. Read the rest of this entry »


What employers need to know about the July jobs report

by Veronica Blatt

July Jobs Report imageToday’s guest blogger is Lily Martis, Monster contributor. Monster Worldwide, Inc. (NYSE:MWW), is the global leader in successfully connecting job opportunities and people. Monster uses the world’s most advanced technology to help people Find Better, matching job seekers to opportunities via digital, social and mobile solutions including monster.com®, our flagship website, and employers to the best talent using a vast array of products and services. As an Internet pioneer, more than 200 million people have registered on the Monster Worldwide network.  Today, with operations in more than 40 countries, Monster provides the broadest, most sophisticated job seeking, career management, recruitment and talent management capabilities globally. For more information visit about-monster.com.

The economy added 164,000 jobs in July, while the unemployment rate held at 3.7%. Here’s what you need to know.

Employers and economists alike looked to the July jobs report to set the tone for the second half of this year—and neither were disappointed. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the economy expanded by 164,000 jobs in July. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate remained at a low 3.7%, and average hourly wages jumped up by 8 cents, totaling $27.98. Here are the headlines from July’s report. Read the rest of this entry »


Is LinkedIn Killing Agency Recruiters?

by Veronica Blatt

image of LinkedIn, a tool used by agency recruiters“LinkedIn is killing agency recruiters.”

“LinkedIn is NOT a recruiter’s friend.”

“How much damage has LinkedIn caused your recruiting business?”

These are all phrases I’ve recently heard from agency recruiters. There seems to be a growing concern that LinkedIn is intent on eliminating the need for third-party recruiters and that it’s only a matter of time before it happens.

Does anyone remember the similar sentiment about Monster? Or job boards? Or the Internet? What about the fax machine?

All of these tools were “game-changers” in the recruiting business, for sure. They were radical new tools that changed how recruiting got done. Monster, especially, was viewed as the “enemy” of agency recruiters and likely DID drive some recruiters — those who “specialized” in low-hanging fruit — out of business. But the best recruiters adapted to the changes, adopted some of the tools, and moved on. The angst over LinkedIn sounds to me like more of the “same old, same old.”

Here are five reasons why agency recruiters don’t need to fear LinkedIn:

  • LinkedIn does not magically turn anyone into a recruiter. As I’ve said before, having a hammer at your disposal doesn’t make you a carpenter. Yes, there are “dime a dozen” jobs that don’t require particularly special skills. Some companies, especially larger companies, won’t use agency recruiters to fill these roles. They can likely use LinkedIn or other tools to find suitable candidates who don’t need to be wooed away from their current employer. If those types of roles have been your primary focus, you will need to adapt. Strategic roles, jobs with a unique skill set, or roles that employ an emerging technology, are still extremely difficult (and slow) to fill.
  • Recruiting ≠ Sourcing. Having access to a list of names is not the same as recruiting. If it was, the phone book would have put all the agency recruiters out of business back in the “old days.” Even if the names have been keyword-qualified, they have not yet been recruited.
  • Recruiting is an art, not a science. It requires persuasion, sales, and other soft skills to successfully convert a name into a candidate, broker the offer, make sure the candidate’s family supports the change, help with relocation, and guard against counteroffers, among other things. No matter how great LinkedIn is as a tool, it CAN’T do any of those other things.
  • Lots of people don’t use LinkedIn. Having a LinkedIn profile isn’t the same as being highly engaged on LinkedIn. A lot of people have outdated LinkedIn profiles. There are a lot of other people who don’t even HAVE LinkedIn profiles. No one, whether an agency recruiter, a corporate recruiter, or a hiring manager, will ever find EVERY candidate for EVERY role on LinkedIn.
  • Jobs and skills evolve more rapidly than recruiting tools. Employers are hiring people for jobs that didn’t exist five years ago. The jobs include using tools that didn’t exist 18 months ago. There are many instances where there isn’t an existing talent pool that can be easily found and tapped. If you are keyword searching for a word that isn’t included in a profile, you aren’t going to find the profile. Period.

If you need more convincing that agency recruiters aren’t facing imminent death, here is another great read.

What are YOUR thoughts about how LinkedIn is changing recruiting? Please comment below, and share this blog with others.

 


Will Semantic Searching Reshape Global Recruiting?

by Veronica Blatt

Today’s installment is courtesy of guest blogger Brock Vaughters. Brock is an Account Manager with Monster®, the worldwide leader in successfully connecting people to job opportunities. Monster Worldwide, Inc. (NYSE:MWW), is the global leader in successfully connecting job opportunities and people. Monster uses the world’s most advanced technology to help people Find Better, matching job seekers to opportunities via digital, social and mobile solutions including monster.com®, our flagship website, and employers to the best talent using a vast array of products and services. As an Internet pioneer, more than 200 million people have registered on the Monster Worldwide network.  Today, with operations in more than 40 countries, Monster provides the broadest, most sophisticated job seeking, career management, recruitment and talent management capabilities globally. For more information visit about-monster.com.

Google’s doing it! Apple’s doing it! Microsoft’s doing it! Oracle’s doing it! Are you doing it? Wait… Wait… What is everybody doing?

Well, it’s called semantic searching. It is hard to explain in words (because it doesn’t use keywords), but it uses the concepts behind words – and the context of those words in relation to every other word – in order to search information and return results. If that explanation is still a little fuzzy, let me give you an example.

If a recruiter were looking for a programmer’s resume, using semantic search, he could simply type in the word ‘programmer’, and the system will automatically find matching concepts like Software Developer, J2EE Engineer, and .Net Technical Lead,  without having to construct a complicated Boolean string.

At Monster, with our Power Resume Search, the best part about using semantic search is that you don’t have to understand the technology to use it effectively. Maybe the most surprising aspect of semantic search is that it lets you describe who you’re looking for, almost as if you were speaking with a networking contact who knew all the top candidates out there.

So let’s answer the title question of this post, “Will Semantic Search Reshape Global Recruiting?”

Do companies still need recruiters when semantic search is available? The fact is that most employers who have been using recruiters will find that these human experts will remain essential to the sourcing, recruiting and hiring cycles.

The goal with any advancement in technology is to improve the process and make it user- friendly. The key here is the word “user.” Semantic search will allow global recruiters to do what they do best, which is develop relationships, screen out candidates that look good on paper but aren’t a great fit for one reason or another. Remember that semantic searching using Monster’s Power Resume Search will bring the best candidates to the top of the list, but then the best recruiters take that list and make actual placements. At Monster, our goal is to give the best recruiters the best tools to find that best candidates. Recruiters are a big part of this process.

How much time would you save if your recruiters had a tool that could:

  • Recognize a candidate’s breadth and depth of experience?
  • Identify job hoppers from long-tenured employees?
  • Distinguish “must have” vs. “nice to have” skills?
  • Assess a candidate’s context of experience (i.e. 3 months vs. 10 yrs)?
  • Score a candidate based on recent vs. outdated skills?
  • Automatically identify related skills?
  • Understand the latest industry acronyms?

Monster Power Resume Search uses Monster’s patented 6Sense technology to do all of these things — at lightning speed. How much is your time worth?